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How to start Shampoo production Business


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Shampoo can be define as a hair care product used for the removal of oils, dirt, skin particles, dandruff, environmental pollutants and other contaminant particles that gradually build up in hair. The goal is to remove the unwanted build-up without stripping out so much sebum as to make hair unmanageable.

What Shampoo Does
Unless you've been rolling around in mud, you probably don't have hair that is truly dirty. However, it may feel greasy and look dull. Your skin produces sebum, a greasy substance, to coat and protect hair and the hair follicle. Sebum coats the cuticle or outer keratin coat of each hair strand, giving it a healthy shine. However, sebum also makes your hair look dirty. An accumulation of it causes hair strands to stick together, making your locks look dull and greasy. Dust, pollen, and other particles are attracted to the sebum and stick to it. Sebum is hydrophobic. It waterproofs your skin and hair. You can rinse away salt and skin flakes, but oils and sebum are untouched by water, no matter how much you use.




How Shampoo Works
Shampoo contains detergent, much like you would find in dishwashing or laundry detergent or bath gel. Detergents work as surfactants. They lower the surface tension of water, making it less likely to stick to itself and able to bind with oils and soiling particles. Part of a detergent molecule is hydrophobic. This hydrocarbon portion of the molecule binds to the sebum coating hair, as well as to any oily styling products. Detergent molecules also have a hydrophilic portion, so when you rinse your hair, the detergent is swept away by the water, carrying sebum away with it.

Let's Make Shampoo! 

In a large pan, mix together the olive oil, shortening, and coconut oil.
In a well-ventilated area, preferably wearing gloves and eye protection in case of accidents, mix the lye and water. Use a glass or enameled container. This is an exothermic reaction, so heat will be produced.
Warm the oils to 95°F-98°F and allow the lye solution to cool to the same temperature. One of the easiest ways to accomplish this is to set both containers into a large sink or pan full of water that is at the correct temperature.
When both mixtures are at the proper temperature, stir the lye solution into the oils. The mixture will turn opaque and may darken.
When the mixture has a creamy texture, stir in the glycerine, alcohol, castor oil, and any fragrance oils or colorants.
You have a couple of options here. You can pour the shampoo into soap molds and allow it to harden. To use this shampoo, either lather it with your hands and work it into your hair or else shave flakes into hot water to liquefy it.

The other option is to make liquid shampoo, which involves adding more water to your shampoo mixture and bottling it.
You may have noticed that many shampoos are pearlescent. You can make your homemade shampoo glittery by adding glycol distearate, which is a natural wax derived from stearic acid. The tiny wax particles reflect light, causing the effect.
You know shampoo cleans your hair, but do you know how it works? Here is a look at shampoo chemistry, including how shampoos work and why it's better to use shampoo than soap on your hair.

To get our eBook on shampoo production, please call us 08168710034, or email me ikoiikenna[at]gmail.com.

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